Womanist Pedagogies: Resources for the Podcast

A few background resources for this podcast on womanist pedagogies:

Alice Walker’s definition of womanist:

https://studentaffairs.duke.edu/wc/resource-collection/womanist

Jacqui Alexander. Pedagogies of Crossing: Meditation on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory and the Sacred. Duke University Press, 2006.

Katie Cannon. Black Womanist Ethics. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1988.

Kelly Brown Douglas. Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God. Orbis, 2015.

Jacqueline Grant. White Women’s Christ and Black Women’s Jesus: Feminist Christology and Womanist Response. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1989.

bell hooks. Sisters of the Yam: Black Women and Self-Discovery. New York: Routledge, 2014.

bell hooks. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom. Routledge, 1994.

Zora Neale Hurston. Their Eyes Were Watching God. Harper: 2006.

Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan. Exorcizing Evil: A Womanist Perspective on the Spirituals. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1997.

Gloria Ladson-Billings. The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children. Jossey-Bass, 2009.

Layli Phillips, ed. The Womanist Reader. New York: Routledge, 2006.

Cheryl J. Sanders. Living in the Intersection: Womanism and Afrocentrism in Theology. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress, 1995.

Alice Walker. In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1983.

Traci West. Wounds of the Spirit: Black Women, Violence, and Resistance Ethics. NYU Press, 1999.

Nancy Lynne Westfield, ed. Being Black, Teaching Black: Politics and Pedagogy in Religious Studies. Abingdon, 2008.

Delores Williams. Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1993.

Womanist Pedagogies Part 2

In this second part of the podcast Profs. Westfield and Lockhart-Gilroy go deeper in their discussion of embodied teaching and learning, utilizing womanist epistemologies. Critical race theory provides a framework for understanding the dynamics of race in the classroom. They describe their classrooms as multisensory—honoring the whole selves in the space to make places for the imagination, and the creative mind and body. They leave us with an exploration of what a truly revolutionary womanist pedagogy entails.

The music for part 2 is from “Prayer for Syria” by Paul Myhre, associate director of the Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religious Studies. You can find his music at https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre

Womanist Pedagogies Part 1

Womanist pedagogies is a way of teaching that connects stories and bodies and lived experience in the classroom. In part one of this podcast, I talk with Dr. Nancy Lynne Westfield and Dr. Annie Lockhart-Gilroy of Drew University Theology School about the origins of womanist pedagogies—the forebearers and the definition—and the practices in the classroom. Scholars in multiple academic disciplines adopt the term “womanist” from Alice Walker’s definition in In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens. The focus of the discussion here is in religious education and theological studies. The discussion centers around the “wisdom-speak of the wisdom-kin,” the necessity of kitchen table conversations and the spaces of the ordinary, and the audacity of naming oneself.

Dr. Annie Lockhart-Gilroy (left)  is Assistant Professor of Christian Education and a Louisville Post-Doctoral Fellow at Drew Theology School. She teaches classes in Christian Education and Practical Theology. Her forthcoming book is entitled, Transforming Cities: Nurturing the Sanctified Imagination of Urban Youth.

Dr. Nancy Lynne Westfield (right) is Professor of Religious Education and director of the Public Theology Initiative at Drew University Theology School in Madison, N.J. She is an ordained deacon in the United Methodist Church, a frequent contributor to HuffPost, and a blogger for the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion. She speaks first on the podcast.

The theme music for part 1 is written by Aviva and the Flying Penguins and performed by Aviva and Lance Erik Haugan. You can find more of Lance’s music at https://soundcloud.com/lance-haugan. Additional interstices music is from “Prayer for Syria” by Paul Myhre, associate director of the Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religious Studies. His music is available at https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre/

 

Chris Crass Podcast Part 2

In Part Two of our conversation Chris Crass talks about what activist/popular education and movement building mean for higher education. Chris is a co-founder of the Catalyst Project: Anti-Racism for Collective Liberation (https://collectiveliberation.org/) that offers political education and organizing support. He also discusses his commitment to dismantling patriarchy and misogyny (see his essay: http://thefeministwire.com/2013/06/against-patriarchy-tools-for-men-to-further-feminist-revolution/). Systemic change brings personal transformation. In these times of attacks on equity and racial justice, Chris discusses how to find hope in resilience and resistance. First step: to educate ourselves and show up for racial and gender justice. Chris reminds us: We are the 99%.

 

Chris Crass Podcast Part 1

Activist, organizer, writer and social change agent Chris Crass (http://www.chriscrass.org/) is committed to the long haul of justice work. In Part One of our conversation, Chris talks about his background, the many movement building mentors and the collective liberation of oppressed groups. He is the author of two books, Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy (PM Press, 2013) and Towards the “Other America”: Anti-Racist Resources for White People Taking Action for Black Lives Matter (Chalice Press, 2015). In his anti-racist work he begins with the historical and structural definition of racism from The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond (http://pisab.org/): racism is individual race prejudice plus structural/institutional power. Chris works to build dynamic multiracial alliances, with an intersectional framework—“working class-based, feminist, multiracial movements for collective liberation.”

Stephen D. Brookfield: Resources for the Podcast

Dr. Stephen D. Brookfield’s website:

http://www.stephenbrookfield.com/

The 99ers Band website:

http://www.the99ersband.com/

Brookfield, Stephen, ed. 1987. Learning Democracy: Edward Lindeman on Adult Education and Social Change. London: Routledge, Kegan & Paul.

_____. 2004. The Power of Critical Theory: Liberating Adult Learning and Teaching. New York: Jossey-Bass.

T.J. Jourian: Resources for the Podcast

Here’s some homework: find out about the use of the asterisk:

Avery Tomkins, “Asterisk,” TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 1 (1-2): 26-27: http://tsq.dukejournals.org/content/1/1-2/26.full. See also: “Why we used trans* and don’t anymore”: http://www.transstudent.org/asterisk

Movement Strategy Center: http://movementstrategy.org/

Link to The Transitions Initiative and Transitions Labs: http://movementstrategy.org/msc-approach/transition/

Out of the Spiritual Closet: Organizers Transforming the Practice of Social Justice, Kristin Zimmerman, Neelam Pathi Konda, Brenda Salgado Taj James, MSC, 210:

http://movementstrategy.org/directory/out-of-the-spiritual-closet/

www.liberationspirituality.org

http://www.contemplativemind.org/

Freedom University Georgia: Resources for the Podcast

Freedom University Georgia:  http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/

Click here for the article in The New Yorker 

New Yorker Video on Freedom University Georgia: “The University That Won’t Be Stopped”:

http://video.newyorker.com/watch/notes-from-all-over-the-underground-university-that-won-t-be-stopped

Laura Emiko Soltis, “From Freedom Schools to Freedom University: Liberatory Education, Interracial and Intergenerational Dialogue, and the Undocumented Student Movement in the U.S. South,” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society, Vol. 17, Issue 1-2, June 2015:

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/usou20/17/1-2?nav=tocList

Georgia Undocumented Youth Alliance (GUYA):

https://www.facebook.com/guyaconnect/

Aviva Chomsky, Undocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal, Beacon Press, 2014.

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, The New Press, 2012.

Coalition of Immokalee Workers: http://www.ciw-online.org/

A Podcast of Radical Musings on Social Justice, Pedagogies for Transformation, and Feminist Activism

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