Category Archives: Uncategorized

U-Lead Athens: Educating Un(der)documented students

“United, Unafraid, Undefeated, Unstoppable Leaders.” That is the description by the students of U-Lead Athens. Since August 2014 they meet every Thursday night at Oconee United Methodist Church, on the boundary of the University of Georgia (a university that bans undocumented students). Mentors and allies from the university (the UGA Undocumented Student Alliance) and the community gather to eat and study and plan for the future. Their mission statement states that they assist high school and recent graduates in preparing for college, identifying schools that are open to un(der)documented students, and applying for scholarships and other financial support. U-Lead Athens is a sanctuary, in the many meanings of that term, providing a supportive community.

In August 2018 my daughter Jacy and I visited U-Lead on a Thursday evening and interviewed current college students who returned to visit or volunteer, some current students, the director of volunteers, PhD student Nikki Luke, and two of the co-directors, Prof. JoBeth Allen and Prof. Betina Kaplan. The conversations set the context of the discrimination and anti-immigrant laws in Georgia, the activist work of students and allies to change these laws and provide access to higher education and in-state tuition, as well as working on justice issues around TPS and DACA status. The students shared their stories, their art, and their hopes and challenges.

Equal access to education is a human right. To support U-Lead Athens, click here:

https://www.uleadathens.org/donate

Resources:

U-Lead Athens website home page:

https://www.uleadathens.org/

Eileen Truax, Dreamers: An Immigrant Generation’s Fight for Their American Dream (Beacon, 2015)

Jose Antonio Vargas, Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen (HarperLuxe, 2018).

Laura Wides-Muñoz, The Making of a Dream: How a Group of Undocumented Immigrants Helped Change What It Means to Be an American (Harper, 2018).

For information about DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals):

https://www.uscis.gov/archive/frequently-asked-questions

https://www.nilc.org/issues/daca/daca-litigation-timeline/

Teaching as “Vocation”: Part Two of a Conversation with Irwin Leopando

In Part Two Leopando continues to explore the theological influences on Freire’s thought and activism that sustained him through exile and institutional work (in government and higher education). We discuss the institutional boundaries on using a Freirean method in the college or university classroom, and I admit to being a “failed Freirean.” We talk about what it means to live into as much democracy as possible in our classrooms, and acknowledge the restraints of institutional time (the semester length), grades, the tenure process, and other academic demands. In the end, Freire calls us to accountability—to risk and to dream, and to live into our “vocation.” Tune into the podcast for a fuller definition of what Freire meant by such a theologically infused term as“vocation,” and how this vision forms the basis of his pedagogy of freedom.

Special music at the end of each segment is ”Prayer for Immigrant Children” (2018) by Paul Myhre: 

https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre

Freire and Faith: Part One of a Conversation with Irwin Leopando

Irwin Leopando is Associate Professor of English at LaGuardia Community College, (CUNY) in Queens, NY. He is the author of the book we discuss in this podcast, A Pedagogy of Faith: The Theological Vision of Paulo Freire (Bloomsbury, 2017). Leopando came to study Paulo Freire (1921-1997) in graduate school classes with his dissertation director, Ira Shor. Leopando’s interest in dialogical pedagogy extends into his own teaching of English composition. Also as one who grew up in the Roman Catholic Church, Leopando shares this faith affiliation with Freire.

In Part One of this podcast Leopando talks about his first encounters with Freire in Shor’s classes through Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Leopando became curious in how Freire’s Roman Catholic faith and his own experience of childhood poverty influenced his activism and his pedagogy in the political and social context of Brazil. Liberation theology and the Christian-Marxist dialogue were major influences on Freire’s thought. Democracy requires the literacy of the poor. And a democratic classroom requires the drive to help the learner grow into their own agency.

Resources for the Z Nicolazzo Podcast

Website: https://znicolazzo.weebly.com/

Twitter feed: @trans_killjoy

Trans* Studies in Higher Education Syllabus:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uUFd5pMlLTOigvVtt9uJYmimhH2w4rZL9azrrUiqZJc/edit

Books and articles:

Brookfield, S.D. (2012). Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Catalano, D. C. & Griffin, P. (2016). Sexism, heterosexism, and trans* oppression curriculum design. In M. Adams, L. A. Bell, D. Goodman, & K. Joshi (Eds.), Teaching for diversity and social justice (3rd edition, pp. 183-211). New York: Routledge.

Catalano, C., & Shlasko, D. (2013). Transgender oppression. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, R. Castañeda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zúñiga, (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (3rd ed., pp. 425-459). New York, NY: Routledge.

Garvey, J. C., Chang, S. H., Nicolazzo, Z, & Jackson, R. (Eds.). (2018). Trans* policies and experiences in housing and residence life. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Hall, D.E. & A. Jagose (Eds.). (2012). The Routledge queer studies reader. New York, NY: Routledge.

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York, NY: Routlege.

Nicolazzo, Z. (Ed.). (2018). What’s transgressive about trans* studies in education now? Routledge Special Issues as Books. Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge.

Nicolazzo, Z. (2017). Trans* in college: Transgender students’ strategies for navigating campus life and the institutional politics of inclusion. Sterling, VA: Stylus.
Recipient of the 2017 Publication of the Year Award from the American Educational Research Association’s Division J (Postsecondary Education)

Nicolazzo, Z, Susan B. Marine, & Francisco J. Galarte (Eds. and Introduction). (2015). Trans*formational Pedagogies: A special issue of T*SQ (Transgender Studies Quarterly. Vol 2, No. 3 (August).

Stryker, S. & S. Whittle (Eds.). (2006). The transgender studies reader 1. New York: Routledge.

Stryker, S. & A. Aizura (Eds.). (2013). The transgender studies reader 2. New York: Routledge.

Read to Respond: Trans Rights:

https://dukeupress.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/read-to-respond-trans-rights/

Z Nicolazzo: Part 2: The Trickle Up of Social Justice Education

Nicolazzo asks us, “How do we think about the most vulnerable students on our campuses,” especially those who are multiply marginized? How do we work toward “a practice of freedom” (hooks)? Nicolazzo shows us a broader vision of trans*studies and pedagogies in higher education, and how attention to these intersections of oppression and freedom benefit all students and faculty. “What are we willing to risk in the name of justice?” And how can we collaborate in our classrooms and beyond in a “critical hope”?

 

Freire’s First Critic: An Interview with Carlos Alberto Torres: Part 1

Carlos Alberto Torres is Professor of Social Sciences and Comparative Education at UCLA (2009-present), past Director of the UCLA Latin American center (1995-2005) and founder of the Paulo Freire Institute in São Paulo, Brazil (with Freire in 1991), Buenos Aries, Argentina, and UCLA (since 2002). Prof. Torres is also President of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES). He is the author of numerous articles and books, including Social Theory and Education (with Robert Allan Morrow; SUNY Press, 1995), Comparative Education: The Dialectics of the Global and the Local (with Robert Arnove; Rowan & Littlefield, 2013, and the editor of First Freire: Early Writings in Social Justice Education (Teachers College Press, 2014). He has written short stories and poetry and is also an accomplished gardener and woodworker. A complete list of his background, research and accomplishments can be found on his website, https://carlosatorres.com/

We spoke last summer about the origins of his interests in Freire and democratic education. In Part One of our conversation Torres tells stories about his background in Argentina and the influence not only of Freire but also of the Jesuit priest, teacher,  and liberation theologian Carlos Mugica (1930-1974), who was assassinated by the dictatorship. Mugica’s last words, “Now more than ever, we must be with the people,” resonate with the liberation movements of that time and now.

Resources for Theatre of the Oppressed

Theatre of the Oppressed: Explore Further!

Applied and Interactive Theatre Guide: http://www.tonisant.com/aitg/

Beautiful Trouble website: Theatre of the Oppressed: http://beautifultrouble.org/theory/theater-of-the-oppressed/

Cardboard Citizens (U.K.): http://cardboardcitizens.org.uk/

Center for Performance and Civic Practice: http://www.thecpcp.org/

Centre for Applied Theatre: http://centerforappliedtheatre.org/

CTO Rio (Boal’s original group): http://ctorio.org.br/novosite/

The Forum Project: http://theforumproject.org/about/

The Freire Institute: http://www.freire.org/

The Freire Project: http://www.freireproject.org/

Improv Encyclopedia: http://improvencyclopedia.org/references/Games_for_Actors_and_Non-actors.html

interAct: http://www.cla.csulb.edu/departments/communicationstudies/interact/

International Theatre of the Oppressed Organization: http://www.theatreoftheoppressed.org/en/index.php?useFlash=0

Jan Sanskriti Centre for Theatre of the Oppressed: (India):

http://www.janasanskriti.org/

Just Act: http://www.gasandelectricarts.org/Gas_%26_Electric_Arts/HOME.html

Mandala Center for Change: http://www.mandalaforchange.com/

Pedagogy and Theatre of the Oppressed: http://ptoweb.org/

 Playback North America: https://playbacknorthamerica.com/

The Centre for Playback Theatre: http://www.playbackcentre.org/

International Playback Theatre Network: https://www.iptn.info/

Sojourn Theatre: http://www.sojourntheatre.org/

Theatre of the Oppressed (TOP) Lab: http://www.toplab.org/

Marc Weinblatt: Part Two: Theatre for Systemic Change

In Part Two: Theatre for Systemic Change, Marc talks about his experiences with Forum Theatre and Legislative Theatre in addressing community issues. With over 30 years experience, Marc shows the successes, opportunities, and future vision of his theatre work.

The Mandala Center for Change: “Founded in 1999, the Mandala Center is a multi-disciplinary arts education organization dedicated to community dialogue, social justice, and societal transformation.”

www.mandalaforchange.com

Read the article by Marc Weinblatt & Cheryl Harrison, “Theatre of the Oppressor: Working with Privilege Toward Social Justice,” pp. 21-21 in “Come Closer”: Critical Perspectives on Theatre of the Oppressed, eds. Toby Emert & Ellie Friedland (Peter Lang, 2011).

 

T.J. Jourian: Resources for the Podcast

Here’s some homework: find out about the use of the asterisk:

Avery Tomkins, “Asterisk,” TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 1 (1-2): 26-27: http://tsq.dukejournals.org/content/1/1-2/26.full. See also: “Why we used trans* and don’t anymore”: http://www.transstudent.org/asterisk

Movement Strategy Center: http://movementstrategy.org/

Link to The Transitions Initiative and Transitions Labs: http://movementstrategy.org/msc-approach/transition/

Out of the Spiritual Closet: Organizers Transforming the Practice of Social Justice, Kristin Zimmerman, Neelam Pathi Konda, Brenda Salgado Taj James, MSC, 210:

http://movementstrategy.org/directory/out-of-the-spiritual-closet/

www.liberationspirituality.org

http://www.contemplativemind.org/

The Freedom University Georgia Podcast: Part 2

In Part 2 our guests from Freedom University Georgia (FUGA) talk about their definition of leadership–from the Coalition of Immokalee Workers’ model of “we are all leaders”–through students as “co-conspirators” in their educational experience. Their questioning of the master narrative of current U.S. immigration policy has led them to collective action, with the Georgia Board of Regents and the state legislature. For all the leaders in FUGA, the university is practice for a better world.

As they have found their voices, the media often revises or erases their voices. FUGA speaks truth to power, and those outside can never fully understand the context. In addition, the idea of a democratic classroom is open to sabotage, for those beholden (whether they acknowledge it or not) to the master narrative of traditional banking education (in its various forms) have to find a fatal flaw in the utopian experiment, even if they have to invent a flaw.

It is my hope that this podcast provides some space for these voices to be more fully heard, and the butterflies to soar (see Part 4 for more on butterflies!).