Category Archives: transpolicies in higher education

Resources for the Z Nicolazzo Podcast

Website: https://znicolazzo.weebly.com/

Twitter feed: @trans_killjoy

Trans* Studies in Higher Education Syllabus:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uUFd5pMlLTOigvVtt9uJYmimhH2w4rZL9azrrUiqZJc/edit

Books and articles:

Brookfield, S.D. (2012). Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Catalano, D. C. & Griffin, P. (2016). Sexism, heterosexism, and trans* oppression curriculum design. In M. Adams, L. A. Bell, D. Goodman, & K. Joshi (Eds.), Teaching for diversity and social justice (3rd edition, pp. 183-211). New York: Routledge.

Catalano, C., & Shlasko, D. (2013). Transgender oppression. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, R. Castañeda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zúñiga, (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (3rd ed., pp. 425-459). New York, NY: Routledge.

Garvey, J. C., Chang, S. H., Nicolazzo, Z, & Jackson, R. (Eds.). (2018). Trans* policies and experiences in housing and residence life. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Hall, D.E. & A. Jagose (Eds.). (2012). The Routledge queer studies reader. New York, NY: Routledge.

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York, NY: Routlege.

Nicolazzo, Z. (Ed.). (2018). What’s transgressive about trans* studies in education now? Routledge Special Issues as Books. Oxfordshire, UK: Routledge.

Nicolazzo, Z. (2017). Trans* in college: Transgender students’ strategies for navigating campus life and the institutional politics of inclusion. Sterling, VA: Stylus.
Recipient of the 2017 Publication of the Year Award from the American Educational Research Association’s Division J (Postsecondary Education)

Nicolazzo, Z, Susan B. Marine, & Francisco J. Galarte (Eds. and Introduction). (2015). Trans*formational Pedagogies: A special issue of T*SQ (Transgender Studies Quarterly. Vol 2, No. 3 (August).

Stryker, S. & S. Whittle (Eds.). (2006). The transgender studies reader 1. New York: Routledge.

Stryker, S. & A. Aizura (Eds.). (2013). The transgender studies reader 2. New York: Routledge.

Read to Respond: Trans Rights:

https://dukeupress.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/read-to-respond-trans-rights/

Z Nicolazzo: Part 2: The Trickle Up of Social Justice Education

Nicolazzo asks us, “How do we think about the most vulnerable students on our campuses,” especially those who are multiply marginized? How do we work toward “a practice of freedom” (hooks)? Nicolazzo shows us a broader vision of trans*studies and pedagogies in higher education, and how attention to these intersections of oppression and freedom benefit all students and faculty. “What are we willing to risk in the name of justice?” And how can we collaborate in our classrooms and beyond in a “critical hope”?

 

Trans*Pedagogies: A Conversation with Dr. Z Nicolazzo

Part 1: Toward a Critical Collaborative Pedagogy

From the field of studies in higher education come deep insights into pedagogical theory and practice. In the second of a series on trans*pedagogies, and on the recommendation of Dr. T.J. Jourian, I invited Dr. Z. Nicolazzo to talk about teaching and activism.

Nicolazzo is assistant professor of Trans*Studies in Education in the Center for the Study of Higher Education, University of Arizona, and the author of Trans*in college (Stylus, 2017), and numerous articles.

In Part 1 we discuss the components of “a critical collaborative pedagogy”: “Each time I teach a course, I introduce our classroom as a community in which we all-students and myself—both have responsibilities for our shared learning” (“Teaching Philosophy Statement: Arriving at a Critical Collaborative Pedagogy”). How do we (both trans* and non-trans* educators) do critical pedagogy and how do we practice pedagogy intersectionally? What does it mean for our classrooms and curriculum to pay attention to and learn from trans*pedagogies?

Music for this podcast is provided by fabulous artists:

Opening theme and interstitial music is by Aviva & the Flying Penguins and Lance Eric Haugan.

Ending music on Parts 1 and 2 is “Prayer for Paradise” by Paul Myhre, co-created with Mike Shelton.

T.J. Jourian: Resources for the Podcast

Here’s some homework: find out about the use of the asterisk:

Avery Tomkins, “Asterisk,” TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 1 (1-2): 26-27: http://tsq.dukejournals.org/content/1/1-2/26.full. See also: “Why we used trans* and don’t anymore”: http://www.transstudent.org/asterisk

Movement Strategy Center: http://movementstrategy.org/

Link to The Transitions Initiative and Transitions Labs: http://movementstrategy.org/msc-approach/transition/

Out of the Spiritual Closet: Organizers Transforming the Practice of Social Justice, Kristin Zimmerman, Neelam Pathi Konda, Brenda Salgado Taj James, MSC, 210:

http://movementstrategy.org/directory/out-of-the-spiritual-closet/

www.liberationspirituality.org

http://www.contemplativemind.org/

Dr. T.J. Jourian Podcast, Part 2

 

In these two podcast segments, T.J. explores the current context for trans*educators, the genderism, or forced labeling, the siloing of student affairs staff and faculty, and the possibility of collaborations and working across institutional boundaries. T.J. embodies, in his teaching, workshops, and scholarship, what it means to be intersectional. He shows why faculty in higher education need to build coalitions with student affairs staff. From bell hooks’ statement, “Theory is not inherently healing, liberatory, or revolutionary,” T.J. argues that we need to find and make places of co-learning and co-creating. T.J. asks us to consider: To whom are we accountable? In Part 2 Dr. T.J. Jourian talks about models of campus collaboration for justice, the growing critical mass of transgender scholars who are creating their own agenda and scholarship. He reminds us that “the gender expansive world is a given” and we all need to step up and into the challenges this brings to mainstream pedagogy and curriculum.

One of the items in my “Classroom Agreements” (or ground rules) in every class I teach is: “We will allow each other to make mistakes.” T.J. urges us to take risks, make mistakes, ask for help—but after we have done our homework (see your assignment below). For those of us committed to co-creating democratic spaces in our classes, transpedagogies are necessary, pushing the boundaries to new liberatory possibilities.

T.J. also offers a definition of leadership that is “leaderfull”, incorporating the voices of the masses on the margins. He leaves us with the question, based in reflexivity: “Who are your co-conspirators in the work? Are you a co-conspirator too?”

Follow T.J.’s blog at “Waking Up Tired: Not Your T*oken”: http://www.tjjourian.net/blog-waking-up-tired

Dr. T.J. Jourian Podcast, Part 1

For those who teach in K-12 and higher education: do you have classes/courses that do not include trans voices?

In Part 1 of our conversation with Dr. T.J. Jourian on transpedagogies, we discuss his mentors and influences, including activist Grace Lee Boggs (see his educator’s statement on his website: http://www.tjjourian.net/ )

In this conversation with Dr. T.J. Jourian, we discuss the emerging field of transpedagogies. Jourian has a Ph.D. in Higher Education from Loyola University Chicago (2017) with a dissertation entitled, “My Masculinity Is a Little Love Poem to Myself”: Trans*masculine College Students’ Conceptualizations of Masculinity.” T.J. is also the co-creator of the Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs. He has written extensively in intersectional teaching and justice-centered curriculum and pedagogy.

On his website T.J. offers a definition: “Trans*formational pedagogy foregrounds trans people in achieving the democratic and emancipatory principles of higher education.” Trans* is a method, based in constructivist educational theory, to expose binary thinking and imagine a new dynamic model in gender and sexuality studies. Transpedagogies go beyond mimesis—the mirroring of heteronormativity—to explore the evolving nature of sexual orientation and gender identity. T.J. describes a justice-centered approach to curriculum and pedagogy that all teachers/faculty need to study and incorporate.

T.J. talks about “artivism”—creative activism, the silo-ing of student affairs staff and faculty and ways to cross that divide, and how faculty can address their own excuses for trans-exclusion in their syllabi, aka, the “there is no room” excuse—and setting new, more inclusive priorities in whatever discipline. It’s important to learn to be vulnerable about possibly messing up (and many of us will mess up), and to have students construct learning with us. How do we include pronouns but also move into deeper, structural issues?