Category Archives: power in the classroom

Intersectional Pedagogies Part 2

In Part 2 of the podcast Professors Case and Rios talk about student and institutional resistance and challenges, along with concrete curricular and teach suggestions for a culturally relevant pedagogy.

Intersectional Pedagogy Resources

Dr. Case’s blog has tons of resources and practical materials and is available at:  www.drkimcase.com

www.facebook.com/drcasepedagogy

#myintersections:
http://www.drkimcase.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/myintersections-teach-sample.pdf

Books and Articles:

Carastathis, Anna. 2016. Intersectionality: An Intellectual History. University of Nebraska.

Cole, Elizabeth, Case, Kim A., Rios, Desdamona, Curtin, N. 2011. “Understanding What Students Bring to the Classroom: Moderators of the Effects of Diversity courses on Student Attitudes.” Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 17/4: 397-405.

Case, Kim A., ed. 2013. Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom. Routledge.

Case, Kim A., ed. 2017. Intersectional Pedagogy: Complicating Identity and Social Justice. Routledge.

Cho, Sumi K., Crenshaw, K.W., and Leslie McCall. 2013. “Toward a Field of Intersectionality Studies: Theory, Applications, and Praxis. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 38/4: 785-803.

Collins, Patricia Hill and Serma Bilge. 2016. Intersectionality: Key Concepts. Polity.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé W. 1991. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color.” Stanford Law Review 43: 1241-1299.

Dill, Bonnie Thorton and R.E. Zamrana, eds. 2009. Emerging Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender in Theory, Policy, and Practice. Rutgers University Press.

Dobson, Miriam. “Intersectionality: A Fun Guide.” https://miriamdobson.com/2013/04/24/intersectionality-a-fun-guide/

Granzka, P. 2014. Intersectionality: A Foundation and Frontiers Reader. Westview.

Guidroz, K. and M.T. Berger. 2009. “A Conversation with Founding Scholars of Intersectionality: Kimberlé Crenshaw, Nira Yuval-Davis, and Michelle Fine. Pp. 61-78 in Berger and Guidroz, eds., The Intersectional Approach: Transforming the Academy through Race, Class, and Gender. University of North Carolina Press.

Hancock, Ange-Marie. 2016. Intersectionality: An Intellectual History. Oxford University Press.

May, Vivian. 2015. Pursuing Intersectionality: Unsettling Dominant Imaginaries. Routledge.

Videos:

Teaching Tolerance 101:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6dnj2IyYjE

Intersectionality and Supreme Pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgK3NFvGp58

 

Intersectional Pedagogies

This podcast focuses on intersectional pedagogies, and what the consideration of multiple socially-constructed identities and social locations bring to the learning journey. The conversation is with two leaders in the field, Profs. Kim Case and Desdamona Rios of the University of Houston at Clear Lake. Issues of privilege, power, and social justice are all made clearer in the intersections.

Intersectionality is “a complex analysis of both privileged and oppressed social identities that simultaneously interact to create systemic inequities, and therefore lived experiences of prejudice and discrimination, privilege, and opportunities, and perspectives from particular social locations” (Case, Intersectional Pedagogy).

Kim A. Case, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at the University of Houston-Clear Lake (UHCL) and director of the Applied Social Issues graduate degree. Prof. Case teaches courses She has won multiple teaching and service awards. Her two co-edited books, Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom (Routledge, 2013) and Intersectional Pedagogy: Complicating Identity and Social Justice (Routledge, 2017), bring intersectional theories into pedagogical practices. Kim shows us the practical implications and transformative possibilities of prioritizing intersectional issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and the rest in the college classroom.

Desdamona Rios, Ph.D. is associate professor of Psychology at UHCL. She has a joint doctorate in Women’s Studies and Psychology from the University of Michigan. Her research focus is on narrative identities and promise for Latinx American high school students and LGBTQ college students. Prof. Rios has articles in both of Kim’s edited books; in Deconstructing Privilege: “Recognizing Privilege by Reducing Invisibility: The Global Feminisms Project as a Pedagogical Tool” (with Abigail J. Stewart). In Intersectional Pedagogy she has co-written two articles: “Decentering Student ‘Uniqueness’ in Lessons about Intersectionality” (with M. Bowling and J. Harris) and “Infusing Intersectionality: Complicating the Psychology of Women Course.”

I’ve invited both scholar-activists to guide us through the complicated and vital issues of intersectional theories and practices in the classroom. They discuss issues of student-centered learning environments, the importance of self care, taking risks in the classroom, the current political moment, and social action.

Womanist Pedagogies Part 2

In this second part of the podcast Profs. Westfield and Lockhart-Gilroy go deeper in their discussion of embodied teaching and learning, utilizing womanist epistemologies. Critical race theory provides a framework for understanding the dynamics of race in the classroom. They describe their classrooms as multisensory—honoring the whole selves in the space to make places for the imagination, and the creative mind and body. They leave us with an exploration of what a truly revolutionary womanist pedagogy entails.

The music for part 2 is from “Prayer for Syria” by Paul Myhre, associate director of the Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religious Studies. You can find his music at https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre

Womanist Pedagogies Part 1

Womanist pedagogies is a way of teaching that connects stories and bodies and lived experience in the classroom. In part one of this podcast, I talk with Dr. Nancy Lynne Westfield and Dr. Annie Lockhart-Gilroy of Drew University Theology School about the origins of womanist pedagogies—the forebearers and the definition—and the practices in the classroom. Scholars in multiple academic disciplines adopt the term “womanist” from Alice Walker’s definition in In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens. The focus of the discussion here is in religious education and theological studies. The discussion centers around the “wisdom-speak of the wisdom-kin,” the necessity of kitchen table conversations and the spaces of the ordinary, and the audacity of naming oneself.

Dr. Annie Lockhart-Gilroy (left)  is Assistant Professor of Christian Education and a Louisville Post-Doctoral Fellow at Drew Theology School. She teaches classes in Christian Education and Practical Theology. Her forthcoming book is entitled, Transforming Cities: Nurturing the Sanctified Imagination of Urban Youth.

Dr. Nancy Lynne Westfield (right) is Professor of Religious Education and director of the Public Theology Initiative at Drew University Theology School in Madison, N.J. She is an ordained deacon in the United Methodist Church, a frequent contributor to HuffPost, and a blogger for the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion. She speaks first on the podcast.

The theme music for part 1 is written by Aviva and the Flying Penguins and performed by Aviva and Lance Erik Haugan. You can find more of Lance’s music at https://soundcloud.com/lance-haugan. Additional interstices music is from “Prayer for Syria” by Paul Myhre, associate director of the Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religious Studies. His music is available at https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre/

 

Chris Crass Podcast Part 2

In Part Two of our conversation Chris Crass talks about what activist/popular education and movement building mean for higher education. Chris is a co-founder of the Catalyst Project: Anti-Racism for Collective Liberation (https://collectiveliberation.org/) that offers political education and organizing support. He also discusses his commitment to dismantling patriarchy and misogyny (see his essay: http://thefeministwire.com/2013/06/against-patriarchy-tools-for-men-to-further-feminist-revolution/). Systemic change brings personal transformation. In these times of attacks on equity and racial justice, Chris discusses how to find hope in resilience and resistance. First step: to educate ourselves and show up for racial and gender justice. Chris reminds us: We are the 99%.

 

Stephen D. Brookfield: Resources for the Podcast

Dr. Stephen D. Brookfield’s website:

http://www.stephenbrookfield.com/

The 99ers Band website:

http://www.the99ersband.com/

Brookfield, Stephen, ed. 1987. Learning Democracy: Edward Lindeman on Adult Education and Social Change. London: Routledge, Kegan & Paul.

_____. 2004. The Power of Critical Theory: Liberating Adult Learning and Teaching. New York: Jossey-Bass.

Stephen D. Brookfield on Being a Critically Reflective Teacher: Part 1

Dr. Stephen Brookfield is the John Ireland Endowed Chair at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has been evolving as a teacher and teaching others how to evolve through critical, reflective practices for almost fifty years. He is the author of 18 books on adult learning and education, critical race theory and adult education, teaching through discussion, democratic spaces, power dynamics in the classroom, social justice teaching, and activist education. He incorporates critical theory (e.g. Gramsci, Marcuse, Habermas) and pedagogical theories (e.g. Paulo Freire, Myles Horton, Ira Shor, John Dewey, Eduard Lindeman) in his writing.

In Part 1 Stephen talks about his background and what drew him into teaching. He models what it means to be a critically reflective teacher—in Freire’s words, authoritative, not authoritarian. He continually searches for what’s new, what is yet to be realized—and that awareness involves a critique of power in the classroom. “There is no such thing as a power-free classroom,” he writes. Everything, including naming, reifies power dynamics. “Efforts to introduce more student-centered, empowering activities sometimes, in a teasing contradiction, underscore teachers’ power,” he has written, and faculty have to know and reflect on their own social locations and privileges as they challenge white supremacy, patriarchy, heteronormativity, and capitalism.