Category Archives: power in the classroom

Resources for the Victoria Rue Theatre as Pedagogy Podcast

Victoria Rue’s website:

http://victoriarue.com/

Victoria Rue, Acting Religious: Theatre as Pedagogy in Religious Studies (Pilgrim Press, 2005).

Augusto Boal, Games for Actors and Non-Actors, trans. Adrian Jackson (Routledge, 1992).

_____, Theatre of the Oppressed (Urizen, 1979).

Sandra Butler and Barbara Rosenflum, Cancer in Two Voices (2nd Ed., Spinster Ink Books, 1996).

Joe Chaikin, The Presence of the Actor (Theatre Communications Group, 1972).

Maha Elgenaidi, founder of the Islamic Networks Group (ING):

https://ing.org/maha-elgenaidi/

Vsevold Meyerhold, Meyerhold on Theatre (Bloomsbury Meuthen Drama, 1978).

Pedagogy and Theatre of the Oppressed Conference:

https://ptoweb.org/

Anna Deavere Smith, Fires in the Mirror (Anchor, 1993).

Viola Spolin, Improvisation for the Theatre: A Handbook of Teaching and Directing Techniques (3rd Edition, Northwestern University Press, 1999).

Theology Resources Mentioned in the Podcast:

James H. Cone, A Black Theology of Liberation (Orbis, 2010).

Beverly Harrison, Making the Connections: Essays in Feminist Social Ethics (Beacon, 1986).

_____. Our Right to Choose: Toward a New Ethic of Abortion (Beacon, 1983).

Carter Heyward, God in the Balance: Christian Spirituality in Times of Terror (Pilgrim, 2002).

Dorothee Soelle, Thinking about God: An Introduction to Theology (Wipf & Stock, 2016).

Additional resources for theatre of the oppressed:

 Bell, Lee Anne, Storytelling for Social Justice: Connecting Narrative and the Arts in Antiracist Teaching (Routledge, 2010).

Melisa Cahmann-Taylor and Mariana Souto-Manning, Teachers Act Up!: Creating Multicultural Learning Communities through Theatre (Teachers College Press, 2010).

Cohen-Cruz, Jan, Local Acts: Community-Based Performance in the United States (Rutgers, 2005).

Hannah Fox, Zoomy Zoomy: Improv Games and Exercises for Groups (Tusitala Publishing, 2010).

Katherine S. McKnight and Mary Scruggs, The Second City Guide to Improv in the Classroom: Using Improvisation to Teach Skills and Boost Learning (Jossey-Bass, 2008).

Stanley Pollack and Mary Fusoni, Moving Beyond Icebreakers: An Innovative Approach to Group Facilitation, Learning, and Action (The Center for Teen Empowerment, Inc., 2005).

Michael Rohd, Theatre for Community, Conflict & Dialogue: The Hope Is Vital Training Manual (Heinmann, 1998).

Mady Schutzman and Jan Cohen-Cruz, Playing Boal: Theatre, Therapy, Activism (Routledge, 1994).

Theatre as Pedagogy: Victoria Rue Interview Part 2

In the second half of our conversation Victoria Rue talks about the
importance of theatre in the classroom as a way to break out of the ruts and old habits of traditional teaching. She offers suggestions for tools on the journey, as well as stories of her own experiences of transformative teaching and learning with students. Rue, like Marc Weinblatt in the previous podcast in July, calls attention to theatre as a necessary pedagogical method for social justice education.

Theatre as Pedagogy: A Conversation with Victoria Rue: Part One

Victoria Rue is a professor, author, playwright, theatre director and workshop leader, and Roman Catholic womanpriest. She has taught at San Jose State University from 2004 to the present in Comparative Religious Studies and Women’s Studies. In the Fall of 2018 she will be at Dar Al Calamar University College in Arts and Culture (http://www.daralkalima.edu.ps/en) Palestine as a Fulbright Scholar. For Rue learning is an encounter with the self and others, and theatre is a way to engage the whole person in critical thinking and engaging stories. She uses theatre as a way to teach cooperation, community building and somatic learning (embodied pedagogy). Through theatre games, improvisation, writing exercises, and the performance of plays, Rue creates learning communities that explore new possibilities for social change. Her work addresses issues such as HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, lgbtq issues, and homeless youth. With Augusto Boal, Rue sees “theatre as rehearsal for revolution.” According to Rue: “Theatre is an arena in which we can dream what we want in our society.” Her book, Acting Religious: Theatre as Pedagogy in Religious Studies (Pilgrim Press, 2005) has both theory and practical examples of her pedagogy and theatre work. For more information see her website: www.victoriarue.com

In Part One, Victoria talks about her theatre background and the major influences on her work.

 

Resources for Theatre of the Oppressed

Theatre of the Oppressed: Explore Further!

Applied and Interactive Theatre Guide: http://www.tonisant.com/aitg/

Beautiful Trouble website: Theatre of the Oppressed: http://beautifultrouble.org/theory/theater-of-the-oppressed/

Cardboard Citizens (U.K.): http://cardboardcitizens.org.uk/

Center for Performance and Civic Practice: http://www.thecpcp.org/

Centre for Applied Theatre: http://centerforappliedtheatre.org/

CTO Rio (Boal’s original group): http://ctorio.org.br/novosite/

The Forum Project: http://theforumproject.org/about/

The Freire Institute: http://www.freire.org/

The Freire Project: http://www.freireproject.org/

Improv Encyclopedia: http://improvencyclopedia.org/references/Games_for_Actors_and_Non-actors.html

interAct: http://www.cla.csulb.edu/departments/communicationstudies/interact/

International Theatre of the Oppressed Organization: http://www.theatreoftheoppressed.org/en/index.php?useFlash=0

Jan Sanskriti Centre for Theatre of the Oppressed: (India):

http://www.janasanskriti.org/

Just Act: http://www.gasandelectricarts.org/Gas_%26_Electric_Arts/HOME.html

Mandala Center for Change: http://www.mandalaforchange.com/

Pedagogy and Theatre of the Oppressed: http://ptoweb.org/

 Playback North America: https://playbacknorthamerica.com/

The Centre for Playback Theatre: http://www.playbackcentre.org/

International Playback Theatre Network: https://www.iptn.info/

Sojourn Theatre: http://www.sojourntheatre.org/

Theatre of the Oppressed (TOP) Lab: http://www.toplab.org/

Theatre of Liberation: Marc Weinblatt of the Mandala Center for Change: Part One

“Theatre is a form of knowledge; it should and can also be a means of transforming society. Theatre can help us build our future, rather than just waiting for it.”—Augusto Boal, Theatre of the Oppressed

Marc Weinblatt has been a professional educator, theatre director, activist, and workshop facilitator since 1980 having extensive experience with both adults and youth. An internationally recognized leader in the use of Augusto Boal’s renowned Theater of the Oppressed (T.O.) to stimulate community dialogue and social change, Marc has worked with diverse communities ranging from police to homeless youth, grassroots organizers and laborers to University deans. Internationally, he has worked with activists in Norway, Holland, and Canada, youth workers in Guatemala, refugees in Azerbaijan, ex-combatants in Northern Ireland, construction workers in South Africa, slum families in India, community workers in the Republic of Congo, and victims of war, among others, in Afghanistan. Marc was named “Cultural Envoy” by the U.S. State Department for his work in the Congo in spring 2010. Marc regularly facilitates T.O. based diversity / anti-oppression workshops in a wide variety of contexts across the U.S. with a commitment to bringing a deep sense of spirit and humanity into social justice work. He also directs the multi-generational Poetic Justice Theatre Ensemble which incorporates T.O. and Playback Theatre techniques to generate community dialogue on burning social issues. One of Augusto Boal’s “multipliers”, Marc has trained thousands of people in the use of Theatre of the Oppressed techniques through his classes and annual week-long intensive trainings since the early 1990′s. Marc is also a dedicated father of 4 beautiful boys. (bio from the Mandala Center for Change website: http://www.mandalaforchange.com/site/about-us/our-team/)

In Part One: Theatre of Liberation, Marc shares his theatre background and outlines Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed (TO) and Playback Theatre (founded by Jo Salas and Jonathan Fox). He draws examples from his experience with homeless and lbgtq youth.

 

Intersectional Pedagogies Part 2

In Part 2 of the podcast Professors Case and Rios talk about student and institutional resistance and challenges, along with concrete curricular and teach suggestions for a culturally relevant pedagogy.

Intersectional Pedagogy Resources

Dr. Case’s blog has tons of resources and practical materials and is available at:  www.drkimcase.com

www.facebook.com/drcasepedagogy

#myintersections:
http://www.drkimcase.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/myintersections-teach-sample.pdf

Books and Articles:

Carastathis, Anna. 2016. Intersectionality: An Intellectual History. University of Nebraska.

Cole, Elizabeth, Case, Kim A., Rios, Desdamona, Curtin, N. 2011. “Understanding What Students Bring to the Classroom: Moderators of the Effects of Diversity courses on Student Attitudes.” Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 17/4: 397-405.

Case, Kim A., ed. 2013. Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom. Routledge.

Case, Kim A., ed. 2017. Intersectional Pedagogy: Complicating Identity and Social Justice. Routledge.

Cho, Sumi K., Crenshaw, K.W., and Leslie McCall. 2013. “Toward a Field of Intersectionality Studies: Theory, Applications, and Praxis. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 38/4: 785-803.

Collins, Patricia Hill and Serma Bilge. 2016. Intersectionality: Key Concepts. Polity.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé W. 1991. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color.” Stanford Law Review 43: 1241-1299.

Dill, Bonnie Thorton and R.E. Zamrana, eds. 2009. Emerging Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender in Theory, Policy, and Practice. Rutgers University Press.

Dobson, Miriam. “Intersectionality: A Fun Guide.” https://miriamdobson.com/2013/04/24/intersectionality-a-fun-guide/

Granzka, P. 2014. Intersectionality: A Foundation and Frontiers Reader. Westview.

Guidroz, K. and M.T. Berger. 2009. “A Conversation with Founding Scholars of Intersectionality: Kimberlé Crenshaw, Nira Yuval-Davis, and Michelle Fine. Pp. 61-78 in Berger and Guidroz, eds., The Intersectional Approach: Transforming the Academy through Race, Class, and Gender. University of North Carolina Press.

Hancock, Ange-Marie. 2016. Intersectionality: An Intellectual History. Oxford University Press.

May, Vivian. 2015. Pursuing Intersectionality: Unsettling Dominant Imaginaries. Routledge.

Videos:

Teaching Tolerance 101:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6dnj2IyYjE

Intersectionality and Supreme Pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgK3NFvGp58

 

Intersectional Pedagogies

This podcast focuses on intersectional pedagogies, and what the consideration of multiple socially-constructed identities and social locations bring to the learning journey. The conversation is with two leaders in the field, Profs. Kim Case and Desdamona Rios of the University of Houston at Clear Lake. Issues of privilege, power, and social justice are all made clearer in the intersections.

Intersectionality is “a complex analysis of both privileged and oppressed social identities that simultaneously interact to create systemic inequities, and therefore lived experiences of prejudice and discrimination, privilege, and opportunities, and perspectives from particular social locations” (Case, Intersectional Pedagogy).

Kim A. Case, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at the University of Houston-Clear Lake (UHCL) and director of the Applied Social Issues graduate degree. Prof. Case teaches courses She has won multiple teaching and service awards. Her two co-edited books, Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom (Routledge, 2013) and Intersectional Pedagogy: Complicating Identity and Social Justice (Routledge, 2017), bring intersectional theories into pedagogical practices. Kim shows us the practical implications and transformative possibilities of prioritizing intersectional issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and the rest in the college classroom.

Desdamona Rios, Ph.D. is associate professor of Psychology at UHCL. She has a joint doctorate in Women’s Studies and Psychology from the University of Michigan. Her research focus is on narrative identities and promise for Latinx American high school students and LGBTQ college students. Prof. Rios has articles in both of Kim’s edited books; in Deconstructing Privilege: “Recognizing Privilege by Reducing Invisibility: The Global Feminisms Project as a Pedagogical Tool” (with Abigail J. Stewart). In Intersectional Pedagogy she has co-written two articles: “Decentering Student ‘Uniqueness’ in Lessons about Intersectionality” (with M. Bowling and J. Harris) and “Infusing Intersectionality: Complicating the Psychology of Women Course.”

I’ve invited both scholar-activists to guide us through the complicated and vital issues of intersectional theories and practices in the classroom. They discuss issues of student-centered learning environments, the importance of self care, taking risks in the classroom, the current political moment, and social action.

Womanist Pedagogies Part 2

In this second part of the podcast Profs. Westfield and Lockhart-Gilroy go deeper in their discussion of embodied teaching and learning, utilizing womanist epistemologies. Critical race theory provides a framework for understanding the dynamics of race in the classroom. They describe their classrooms as multisensory—honoring the whole selves in the space to make places for the imagination, and the creative mind and body. They leave us with an exploration of what a truly revolutionary womanist pedagogy entails.

The music for part 2 is from “Prayer for Syria” by Paul Myhre, associate director of the Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religious Studies. You can find his music at https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre

Womanist Pedagogies Part 1

Womanist pedagogies is a way of teaching that connects stories and bodies and lived experience in the classroom. In part one of this podcast, I talk with Dr. Nancy Lynne Westfield and Dr. Annie Lockhart-Gilroy of Drew University Theology School about the origins of womanist pedagogies—the forebearers and the definition—and the practices in the classroom. Scholars in multiple academic disciplines adopt the term “womanist” from Alice Walker’s definition in In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens. The focus of the discussion here is in religious education and theological studies. The discussion centers around the “wisdom-speak of the wisdom-kin,” the necessity of kitchen table conversations and the spaces of the ordinary, and the audacity of naming oneself.

Dr. Annie Lockhart-Gilroy (left)  is Assistant Professor of Christian Education and a Louisville Post-Doctoral Fellow at Drew Theology School. She teaches classes in Christian Education and Practical Theology. Her forthcoming book is entitled, Transforming Cities: Nurturing the Sanctified Imagination of Urban Youth.

Dr. Nancy Lynne Westfield (right) is Professor of Religious Education and director of the Public Theology Initiative at Drew University Theology School in Madison, N.J. She is an ordained deacon in the United Methodist Church, a frequent contributor to HuffPost, and a blogger for the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion. She speaks first on the podcast.

The theme music for part 1 is written by Aviva and the Flying Penguins and performed by Aviva and Lance Erik Haugan. You can find more of Lance’s music at https://soundcloud.com/lance-haugan. Additional interstices music is from “Prayer for Syria” by Paul Myhre, associate director of the Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religious Studies. His music is available at https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre/