Category Archives: popular education

Resources for Economic Justice Work

Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickle and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America. Picador, 2011.

Donald Hirsch and Laura Valadez-Martinez, The Living Wage. Agenda, 2017.

Stephanie Luce, Fighting for a Living Wage. ILR Press, 2004.

Annelise Orleck, “We Are All Fast Food Workers Now.” The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages. Beacon, 2018.

Robert Pollin and Mark Brenner, A Measure of Fairness: The Economics of Living Wages and Minimum Wages in the U.S. Cornell University Press, 2008.

Robert Pollin and Stephanie Luce, The Living Wage: Building a Fair Economy. New Press, 2000.

David K. Shipler, The Working Poor: Invisible in America. Vintage, 2005.

Melissa Snarr, All You That Labor: Religion and Ethics in the Living Wage Movement. NYU Press, 2011.

Donald R. Stabile, The Living Wage: Lessons from the History of Economic Thought. Edward Elgar, 2009.

Interfaith Worker Justice: http://www.iwj.org/

Jobs with Justice: http://www.jwj.org/

United for a Fair Economy: http://www.faireconomy.org/

UFE’s Campus Living Wage Manual: http://www.campusactivism.org/server-new/uploads/campuslivingwagemanual.pdf

United Students Against Sweatshops: http://usas.org/

Family Budget Calculators:

Economic Policy Institute: https://www.epi.org/resources/budget/

MIT Living Wage Calculator: http://livingwage.mit.edu/

Fact Sheet for Living Wage at Agnes Scott College:

http://tinapippin.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/LWFactsheet-Nov2017-2.docx

Septima Clark and the Citizenship Schools: Resources for the Podcast

 

http://www.highlandercenter.org/

A brief video on Highlanders’ popular education model:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsxVW0oXFvI&feature=youtu.be

Frank Adams with Myles Horton, Seeds of Fire: The Idea of Highlander (Blair, 1975).

Katherine Charron, Freedom’s Teacher: The Life of Septima Clark (UNC Press, 2009).

Septima Poinsette Clark and Cynthia Stokes Brown, Ready from Within: A First Person Narrative (Red Sea Press, 1990).

John M. Glen, Highlander: No Ordinary School (University of Tennessee Press, 1996).

Faith S. Holsaert, et al., eds., Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC (University of Illinois Press, 2012).

Patrisse-Khan-Cullors and Asha Bandele, When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir (St. Martins Press, 2018).

Grace Jordan McFadden, “Septima P. Clark and the Struggle for Human Rights.” Women in the Civil Rights Movement: Trailblazers and Torchbearers 1941-1965. Ed. Vicki L. Crawford, Jacqueline Anne Rouse, and Barbara Woods. Bloomington: Indiana University Press (1993), pp. 85–97.

Lynne Olson, Freedom’s Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830-1970 (Scribner, 2012).

Barbara Ransby, Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision (UNC Press, 2005).

Sweet Honey in the Rock: http://sweethoneyintherock.org/

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, ed., How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective (Haymarket Books, 2017).

Catching the Spirit of Septima: Highlander Center update podcast (2-18-18) with Allyn Maxfield-Steele on the New Septima Clark Learning Center

Rev. Allyn Maxfield-Steele was recently in Atlanta and I met with him to learn about the plans for the new Septima Clark Learning Center that will be built at the Highlander Research Center in New Market, TN, where he works as co-director with Ash-Lee Woodward Henderson.

Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987) was an educator and civil rights activist, and served as director of workshops and the Citizenship Schools Program at Highlander. In 1961 the citizenship schools moved over to the SCLC and Septima became its director of education and teaching. Septima’s cousin, Bernice Robinson, attended a Highlander workshop in 1955 with Esau Jenkins and helped to start citizenship schools in Septima’s hometown of Charleston. Septima’s teaching philosophy was to teach people to teach other people, which forms the heart of popular education pedagogy at Highlander. The new learning center will honor her legacy by providing space, materials, and spirit for movement builders into the future.

Opening theme music is by Aviva and the Flying Penguins and performed by Aviva and Lance Erik Haugan. Music for the ending credits is “Rise Up” by Audra Day, performed by Agnes Scott College student Victoria Martin of the Joyful Noise Gospel Choir and accompanied by Dr. Nathan H. Grigsby, James T. and Ella Rather Kirk Artist Affiliate and Director of Joyful Noise, at the occasion of the Teach-In for Economic Justice at Agnes Scott on Feb. 16, 2018.

This interview took place at East Pole Coffee in Atlanta, GA: http://eastpole.coffee/

Chris Crass Podcast Part 2

In Part Two of our conversation Chris Crass talks about what activist/popular education and movement building mean for higher education. Chris is a co-founder of the Catalyst Project: Anti-Racism for Collective Liberation (https://collectiveliberation.org/) that offers political education and organizing support. He also discusses his commitment to dismantling patriarchy and misogyny (see his essay: http://thefeministwire.com/2013/06/against-patriarchy-tools-for-men-to-further-feminist-revolution/). Systemic change brings personal transformation. In these times of attacks on equity and racial justice, Chris discusses how to find hope in resilience and resistance. First step: to educate ourselves and show up for racial and gender justice. Chris reminds us: We are the 99%.

 

Chris Crass Podcast Part 1

Activist, organizer, writer and social change agent Chris Crass (http://www.chriscrass.org/) is committed to the long haul of justice work. In Part One of our conversation, Chris talks about his background, the many movement building mentors and the collective liberation of oppressed groups. He is the author of two books, Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy (PM Press, 2013) and Towards the “Other America”: Anti-Racist Resources for White People Taking Action for Black Lives Matter (Chalice Press, 2015). In his anti-racist work he begins with the historical and structural definition of racism from The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond (http://pisab.org/): racism is individual race prejudice plus structural/institutional power. Chris works to build dynamic multiracial alliances, with an intersectional framework—“working class-based, feminist, multiracial movements for collective liberation.”

Freedom University Georgia: Resources for the Podcast

Freedom University Georgia:  http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/

Click here for the article in The New Yorker 

New Yorker Video on Freedom University Georgia: “The University That Won’t Be Stopped”:

http://video.newyorker.com/watch/notes-from-all-over-the-underground-university-that-won-t-be-stopped

Laura Emiko Soltis, “From Freedom Schools to Freedom University: Liberatory Education, Interracial and Intergenerational Dialogue, and the Undocumented Student Movement in the U.S. South,” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society, Vol. 17, Issue 1-2, June 2015:

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/usou20/17/1-2?nav=tocList

Georgia Undocumented Youth Alliance (GUYA):

https://www.facebook.com/guyaconnect/

Aviva Chomsky, Undocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal, Beacon Press, 2014.

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, The New Press, 2012.

Coalition of Immokalee Workers: http://www.ciw-online.org/

The New Yorker Article: A Conversation with Freedom U. GA Students

photo credit: Laura Emiko Soltis

In this 12 minute bonus segment Arizbeth and Rafael respond to The New Yorker article by Jonathan Blitzer from May 22, 2017: “An Underground College for Undocumented Immigrants.” Rafael ends the segment with his poem, “The Monarch Martyr.” In this photo you see Freedom U. students at a University of Georgia class right before their arrest. The butterfly wings idea originated from artist activist David Solnit, a puppeteer who has used his art in social movements for over thirty years (e.g. the World Trade Protests in Seattle in 1999). He uses art in protest and revolution, and the Freedom U. students adapted his creative strategy for their courageous acts of resistance.

photo credit: Laura Emiko Soltis

How to support Freedom University Georgia? Donations to this grassroots sanctuary movement go a long way to making their dreams of educational equality a reality. Professors volunteer, but funds are needed for classroom space, books, college tours, and pizzas. If you live in metro Atlanta, there are volunteer opportunities, such as being a driver. If you are connected with a college or university, make sure you have policies to support and provide opportunities for students like the ones on this podcast. Check out their website [www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate] and Facebook page [Freedom U. Georgia] for current updates and connections. Nothing Never Happens will keep in touch with these new friends and will post updates too.

Freedom University Georgia Poetry

In this bonus segment Freedom University Georgia students show us how the use of the arts informs and propels their movement toward educational equality. They give us insights into their journey across borders.

They share nine poems with us:

“Sandman,” “The Life of a Crayon,” and “Maybe” — Mileidi Salinas
“A Monster” –Arizbeth Sanchez
“Engines of the Wild, Wild West” — Rafael Aragon
“Nameful” — Arizbeth
“El Señor de los Salmos” — Rafael
link to the translation
“Letter to My Younger Self” — Arizbeth
“Astronomy” — Rafael