Category Archives: critical race theory

Womanist Pedagogies: Resources for the Podcast

A few background resources for this podcast on womanist pedagogies:

Alice Walker’s definition of womanist:

https://studentaffairs.duke.edu/wc/resource-collection/womanist

Jacqui Alexander. Pedagogies of Crossing: Meditation on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory and the Sacred. Duke University Press, 2006.

Katie Cannon. Black Womanist Ethics. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1988.

Kelly Brown Douglas. Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God. Orbis, 2015.

Jacqueline Grant. White Women’s Christ and Black Women’s Jesus: Feminist Christology and Womanist Response. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1989.

bell hooks. Sisters of the Yam: Black Women and Self-Discovery. New York: Routledge, 2014.

bell hooks. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom. Routledge, 1994.

Zora Neale Hurston. Their Eyes Were Watching God. Harper: 2006.

Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan. Exorcizing Evil: A Womanist Perspective on the Spirituals. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1997.

Gloria Ladson-Billings. The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children. Jossey-Bass, 2009.

Layli Phillips, ed. The Womanist Reader. New York: Routledge, 2006.

Cheryl J. Sanders. Living in the Intersection: Womanism and Afrocentrism in Theology. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress, 1995.

Alice Walker. In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1983.

Traci West. Wounds of the Spirit: Black Women, Violence, and Resistance Ethics. NYU Press, 1999.

Nancy Lynne Westfield, ed. Being Black, Teaching Black: Politics and Pedagogy in Religious Studies. Abingdon, 2008.

Delores Williams. Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1993.

Womanist Pedagogies Part 2

In this second part of the podcast Profs. Westfield and Lockhart-Gilroy go deeper in their discussion of embodied teaching and learning, utilizing womanist epistemologies. Critical race theory provides a framework for understanding the dynamics of race in the classroom. They describe their classrooms as multisensory—honoring the whole selves in the space to make places for the imagination, and the creative mind and body. They leave us with an exploration of what a truly revolutionary womanist pedagogy entails.

The music for part 2 is from “Prayer for Syria” by Paul Myhre, associate director of the Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religious Studies. You can find his music at https://www.reverbnation.com/paulomyhre